Teachers paid to do entire job

Editor:

While I understand the ‘job action’ being taken by our teachers, I ask: is it doing right by our children?

Editor:

While I understand the ‘job action’ being taken by our teachers, I ask: is it doing right by our children?

A few observations:

• Parent/teacher meetings are not being held. I understand that the teachers are proving a point by refraining from administrative duties. Imagine, though, if your child was having difficulty in the classroom. As a parent, I need to know this – the earlier the better. Otherwise, my child is at risk of falling behind, and having a very negative impact on their learning.

• Report cards may not be issued?  Again, how do I know if my child needs help, and how do I get them the help they need if I am unaware?  Some children are embarrassed or afraid to tell someone that they need help. It is the responsibility of the teaching professional to notify parents so that they may assist their child in getting the help they need.

I am a working professional, and if I were to go to my boss and request a raise or a change in working conditions – and they say “no”  – I have a few options. I can look for a new job or decide to accept what is. However, if I continue to work, for the same pay, I am expected to fulfill all my duties or risk termination.

If the teachers are getting their regular pay during ‘job action,’ shouldn’t they be expected to do their entire job, including parent/teacher meetings, report cards, field trips, etc.?

Just my two cents, but it seems to me that our children are the ones that are really being impacted by this job action.

Karen Bodenheimer, White Rock