Win-at-all-costs all too common

Editor:

The sad tale of Lance Armstrong goes far beyond his attempt at purging his sins in the faint hope of redemption.

Editor:

The sad tale of Lance Armstrong goes far beyond his seemingly calculated attempt at purging his sins in the faint hope of redemption.

On the surface, his actions are clearly repugnant, yet in today’s reality, Armstrong merely reflects a problem that runs deeper and far more pervasively than it first appears. His tainted legacy of lying, cheating, doping and bullying to secure a victory illustrates a toxic environment in which we are all immersed. This ‘win-at-all-costs mentality’ has permeated almost every segment of our culture, whether it be sports, entertainment, business or social values. How are we enriched as a society by cheating or bullying our way to the top?

Victory by this method is hollow.

We have obviously lost sight of what a true champion in life is, and it is time to redefine our values and our measurements of success.

My journey of seeking meaning through the hopes of winning Olympic gold in 1968 – and falling just short – has been a driving force in my life. My Olympic meltdown and emotional aftermath led me down an ever-evolving path of lessons. This ironic twist of fate eventually guided me to redefine my values and goals, inspiring to write my new website questbeyondgold.ca

Ultimately, it is not up to us to forgive Lance for his indiscretions but for Lance himself because, in the end, the most damaging lies are the ones we tell ourselves.

Elaine Tanner, Surrey