Former Surrey Eagle captain thinks NHL in Seattle ‘is going to be huge’

Former Surrey Eagle captain thinks NHL in Seattle ‘is going to be huge’

Seattle resident Kris Wilson excited at expansion team coming to his hometown

Last spring, a season-ticket drive in Seattle – intended to gauge interest in a potential NHL expansion team – saw fans in the Emerald City commit to more than 30,000 tickets in just a few hours.

The response surprised many in the hockey world, even the potential team owners behind the campaign, with one saying at the time that he was “shell-shocked.”

One person who wasn’t surprised was former Surrey Eagles captain Kris Wilson, who grew up in the U.S. city, captained the BC Hockey League team to a Royal Bank Cup championship in 1998 and is still heavily involved in Seattle’s local minor-hockey community.

He couldn’t get tickets during that drive last March – “Didn’t get in there in time,” he laughed – but he’s still confident he’ll find a way to make it to a few games when the NHL’s newest expansion team hits the ice for the 2020/21 season.

A Seattle franchise was officially approved by the NHL’s board of governors at meetings Tuesday.

“It’s really big news today, obviously,” Wilson told Peace Arch News soon after the league made its announcement.

“Being in the hockey community here, there’s been a buzz about (the NHL) for quite a long time. People thought this would happen and were pretty confident that it would after that ticket drive… it was pretty amazing, 32,000 tickets in 2½ hours.

• READ ALSO: Former Surrey Eagles reflect on 20-year anniversary of Royal Bank Cup title

• READ ALSO: Seattle to officially get NHL team

• READ ALSO: Canucks looking to build rivalry with new Seattle hockey team

Some have questioned whether Seattle will be successful as a hockey market, though the city does have a long history with the sport. The Seattle Thunderbirds have been a staple of the Western Hockey League for years, as have the nearby Everett Silvertips. And a century ago – prior to the formation of the NHL – the Seattle Metropolitans became the first U.S. team to win the Stanley Cup, beating the National Hockey Association’s Montreal Canadiens in 1917.

Count Wilson among those who is confident an NHL team won’t just survive in Seattle, but thrive.

“I think it’s going to be huge, I really do. Right now, the game has grown so much already, especially since I was a kid playing in this area, and my uncles, too, who were hockey players back in the ’70s,” he explained.

“The people of Seattle, when they see the game in front of them… they’re going to become huge fans and really embrace the sport. I think it’s really going to take over and really create a new hockey buzz in this area.”

Wilson, 41, played four seasons for the Eagles in the mid-1990s. After graduating from the BCHL, he spent four years playing for NCAA Div. 3 University of Wisconsin Superior.

Since then, he’s also appeared in the movie Miracle – he played U.S. hockey player Phil Verchota in the film about the U.S. national team’s Miracle on Ice win in 1980 – and he is currently the skills co-ordinator for Seattle’s Sno-Kings Minor Hockey Association.

Though he’s already seen the sport grow in the decades he’s been involved, Wilson expects the new NHL team to have the same long-term effect in Seattle that it had in California in the 1990s, when Wayne Gretzky’s arrival saw a massive uptick in local interest in the NHL and hockey in general.

“There’s a lot of great athletes in the Greater Seattle area. You see a lot of football players and a lot of basketball players come out of here – guys drafted in the first rounds (of their sports) in the last 10, 15 years,” said Wilson, lives in nearby Bothell, Wash.

“I think in 15 to 20 years, you’ll see a surge of Seattle hockey players.”

One problem that will hinder the sport’s growth is a lack of ice sheets in the city and surrounding suburbs, he admits.

“Right now, we’re maxed out. Until we get 10 more sheets in the metro area, I don’t think we’ll see that huge boom, but we’ll still see a massive bump in interest – we’re already seeing it. Myself, being involved in minor hockey, I’ve seen it grow two-fold, three-fold already. Now, it’s really going to boom, I think.”

Though he’s excited at the prospect of being able to take his two young sons – aged two and four – to an NHL game in their hometown soon, Wilson said the NHL news has led him to spend a little time reminiscing about his own childhood playing a sport that, at the time, was still considered niche.

Wilson grew up in north Seattle, in a neighbourhood now called Shoreline, and he admits to still fostering a certain level of bewilderment that the new NHL’s team’s proposed practice facility is set to be built just a block or two away from his childhood home.

It’s a feeling he shares with his brother-in-law, Jonas, who grew up in the same neighbourhood and was a youth-league linemate and close friend of Wilson’s growing up. (They married sisters).

“For him and I, when they announced that the practice facility was going to go at Northgate (Mall), that was pretty crazy,” Wilson said. “I called him and he said, ‘Can you believe where we used to ride our bikes, now there’s going to be an NHL practice rink?

“For him and I, it’s pretty sentimental – that’s our neighbourhood.”



sports@peacearchnews.com

Visit us at peacearchnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

BCHLNHLSurrey Eagles

Just Posted

A student arrives at school as teachers dressed in red participate in a solidarity march to raise awareness about cases of COVID-19 at Ecole Woodward Hill Elementary School, in Surrey, B.C., on Tuesday, February 23, 2021. A number of schools in the Fraser Health region, including Woodward Hill, have reported cases of the B.1.7.7 COVID-19 variant first detected in the U.K. (File photo: THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)
COVID-19 cases at Surrey school district drop ‘dramatically’

There were 19 notifications sent out in the first 9 days of June, compared to in all of 245 in May

teaser photo only.
Surrey ‘POP!’ series promises ‘Performances Outdoors in Parks’ this summer

Ticketed concerts, theatre shows and other events start July 9

1,001 Steps – along with Christopherson Steps – was closed by the City of Surrey last spring in an attempt to halt the spread of COVID-19. They are set to reopen this week, as a note on a city sign attests (inset). (File photo/Contributed photo)
South Surrey’s beach-access stairs set to reopen

Christopherson Steps, 1,001 Steps have been closed since April 2020 due to COVID-19 pandemic

Surrey council chambers. (File photo)
Surrey council endorses ‘public engagement’ strategy

Council approves ‘Public Engagement Strategy and Toolkit,’ and a ‘Big Vision, Bold Moves’ transportation public engagement plan

Surrey City Hall. (File photo)
Surrey council approves $7.3 million contract for street paving projects

City council awarded Lafarge Canada Inc. $7,326,667.95 for 15 road projects in North Surrey and one in South Surrey

People watch a car burn during a riot following game 7 of the NHL Stanley Cup final in downtown Vancouver, B.C., in this June 15, 2011 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Howe
10 years ago: Where were you during the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup Riots?

Smashed-in storefronts, looting, garbage can fires and overturned cars some of the damage remembered today

Ivy was thrown out of a moving vehicle in Kelowna. Her tail was severely injured and will be amputated. (BC SPCA)
Kitten thrown from moving vehicle, needs help: Kelowna SPCA

The seven-month-old kitten had severe tail and femur injuries

A health-care worker holds up a sign signalling she needs more COVID-19 vaccines at the ‘hockey hub’ mass vaccination facility at the CAA Centre during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brampton, Ont., on Friday, June 4, 2021. This NHL-sized hockey rink is one of CanadaÕs largest vaccination centres. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
‘Vaxxed to the max’: Feds launch Ask an Expert campaign to encourage COVID shots

Survey shows that confidence in vaccines has risen this spring

Port Alberni court house (Alberni Valley News)
Inquest set into 2016 death of B.C. teen after a day spent in police custody

18-year-old Jocelyn George died of heart failure in hospital after spending time in jail cell

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Children’s shoes and flowers are shown after being placed outside the Ontario legislature in Toronto on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Ontario commits $10 million to investigate burial sites at residential schools

Truth and Reconciliation Commission identified 12 locations of unmarked burial sites in Ontario

Singer-songwriter Jann Arden is pictured with a draft horse. (Canadian Horse Defence Coalition)
Jann Arden backs petition to stop ‘appalling’ live horse export, slaughter

June 14 is the International Day to End Live Export of Animals

A letter from a senior RCMP officer in Langley said Mounties who attended a mayor’s gala in January of 2020 used their own money. Controversy over the event has dogged mayor Val van den Broek (R) and resulted in the reassignment of Langley RCMP Supt. Murray Power (L). (file)
Langley RCMP officers used ‘own money’ to attend mayor’s gala, senior officer says

‘I would not want there to be a belief that the police officers had done something untoward’

Squirrels are responsible for most of U.S. power outages. Black Press file photo
Dead squirrels in park lead Richmond RCMP to probe ‘toxic substance’ found in trees

Police aren’t sure if the chemical was dumped there or placed intentionally

Most Read