Nick Greenizan photo                                 Semiahmoo’s Alina von Hahn uses her foot to try and block a pass.

Nick Greenizan photo Semiahmoo’s Alina von Hahn uses her foot to try and block a pass.

Surrey Ultimate teams engage in turf battle

Second annual Myles Winch memorial event held Friday at Semiahmoo Secondary

Some of the top ultimate teams from throughout Surrey laced up their cleats Friday at Semiahmoo Secondary to take part in the second annual Myles Winch Memorial Ultimate Tournament.

The event – held in honour of Semiahmoo’s former athletic director, who passed away in 2016 after a battle with cancer – was held on the turf fields at South Surrey Athletic Park.

Ultimate is a team sport in which players pass a disc – or Frisbee – up the field to one another, and points are scored when teams can get the disc into the opposition end zone, not unlike football.

The top spot in Friday’s tournament went to the Guildford Park Sabres’ Green (Tier 1) team, which beat the Lord Tweedsmuir Panthers in the championship game on Friday afternoon. Queen Elizabeth Secondary finished in third place, while the hosts from Semiahmoo ended the day in sixth spot, after being bounced from title contention by the Fraser Heights Firehawks.

Friday’s event also served as a fundraiser for the Go Play Outside scholarship fund, which was created in Winch’s honour and awards bursaries to students who plan to study outdoor education after high school.

High-school students aren’t the only ones taking up ultimate in the Surrey school district, either. On May 3, an elementary-school “Play Day” is planned for South Surrey Athletic Park. That event – set to run from noon until 5 p.m. – is to feature 32 elementary school teams from throughout the district.

The event is the largest one of its kind in the district, Chantrell Creek Elementary teacher Tor Karlsen told Peace Arch News.

“It’s a great way to get kids outside during spring and play a fun, competitive, coed sport that they can hopefully continue to play as they head into high school and further.” he said.

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