Surrey youth soccer programs suspended

2,800 young athletes affected amid allegations of bylaw infractions.

The Central City Football Club (CCFC) is claiming the suspension of both its boys’ and girls’ programs have been levied before the youth soccer group can answer the allegations against it.

The Surrey youth soccer organization, one of the largest in the province with roughly 2,800 members, has been suspended by two district associations recently. While both groups cite several allegations against CCFC, the club claims it has received just one complaint, and it “has not been given an opportunity to respond to the allegations.”

The South District Girls Soccer Association (SDGSA), which governs female youth soccer in Surrey and Delta, suspended CCFC last Friday (July 24). Monday night, the Surrey Metro Soccer Association (SMSA) followed suit, issuing a suspension affecting CCFC boys’ teams.

Under both suspensions, CCFC may not register players for the coming season or participate in events sanctioned by BC Soccer. Disciplinary hearings have been scheduled for Aug. 11 by the SDGSA and Aug. 13 by the SMSA.

Both district associations cite allegations Central City “have made attempts to manipulate” the dates of its annual general meeting, and have been involved in the operation of a non-sanctioned spring/summer league.

The actions by SMSA and SDGSA were taken roughly two weeks after Amar Bains wrote to both bodies, questioning the actions of the Central City executive.

In what he called “an official letter of complaint” to both groups, Bains claimed the CCFC has violated four of its own bylaws. Bains told The Leader Wednesday he has been advised by his lawyer not to comment on the matter.

In the letter, Bains claims the club executive is supporting Canadian Eagles FC, a club not affiliated with BC Soccer, noting seven CCFC executive members are also on the board of Canadian Eagles and are in a conflict-of-interest as defined by CCFC bylaws.

“Monies have been paid from CCFC to Canadian Eagles FC, despite being a non-affiliated BC Soccer Association/District Association soccer club,” wrote Bains, noting bylaws call for the club to be “subject to the rules and regulations” of BC Soccer and its district associations.

He also notes the annual general meeting (AGM) of CCFC was scheduled for Wednesday (July 29), in violation of a bylaw which calls for the AGM to be held prior to June 30 of each year. The late date, Bains writes, means members (parents or guardians of registered players) of the past year will be excluded from the meeting while “next season’s players will be able to participate, contrary to the spirit of the club’s bylaws.”

Attempts by The Leader to contact CCFC were not successful.

On the club website, CCFC claims the two district associations “have acted unfairly in this matter” and the club will “pursue the issue with BC Soccer.”

 

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