Japanese Canadians

Inouye family members at Surrey’s new Inouye Park, 8985 Queen Mary Blvd. Pictured from left are Tami Gunn, Chris Inouye, Barry Inouye (holding dog Sasha), Rob Inouye and Holly Inouye. Tami, Barry, Rob and Holly are grandchildren of Surrey pioneer Zennosuke Inouye, for whom the park is named. (Photo: facebook.com/TheCityofSurrey)

SURREY NOW & THEN: New Inouye Park honours WWI vet who fought to have his land returned

Four grandchildren of Zennosuke Inouye visit Cedar Hills-area park dedicated to the Surrey pioneer

 

About 50 people gathered in Hope on Saturday, May 21, 2022 to hear Premier John Horgan announce $100 million in funding to honour Japanese-Canadians and to “continue the healing for generations to come,” Horgan said. The livestream broadcast of the announcement in Hope was hosted by the Tashme Historical Society. Folks gathered at the Hope Recreation Centre about 20 kilometres northwest of the former Tashme Internment Camp. At 1,200 acres in size, Tashme was Canada’s largest Japanese-Canadian internment site of the Second World War and, at its height, was home to 2,644 people. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)

B.C. commits $100 million to support Japanese Canadians interned in World War II

Funding will go to health and wellness programs for survivors, memorials and public education

 

Sumi Mototsune, right, with her sisters Teruko, left; Kanako, centre; and Haruye, front. Sumi, who was sent to an internment camp with her family, was one of Joan Parolin’s penpals. The two met at school in Surrey. (Submitted photo: UBC Library)

Online exhibit launches featuring wartime letters between Surrey student, Japanese Canadian friends

Interactive exhibit gives context to letters during a time of forced dispersal for Japanese Canadians

 

The Murakami family in Greenwood, B.C., in a photo featured in “Broken Promises” at Museum of Surrey. Opening Feb. 5, the exhibition explores the dispossession of Japanese-Canadians in the 1940s. (Photo courtesy Salt Spring Island Archives)

Museum of Surrey’s new ‘Broken Promises’ explores ‘dark part of Canadian history’

Touring exhibition about Japanese-Canadians ‘a vehicle to start a conversation with children about racism’

The Murakami family in Greenwood, B.C., in a photo featured in “Broken Promises” at Museum of Surrey. Opening Feb. 5, the exhibition explores the dispossession of Japanese-Canadians in the 1940s. (Photo courtesy Salt Spring Island Archives)
Sumi Mototsune, right, with her sisters Teruko, left; Kanako, centre; and Haruye, front. Sumi, who was sent to an internment camp with her family, was one of Joan Parolin’s penpals. The two met at school in Surrey. (Submitted photo: UBC Library)

Wartime letters between Surrey teen and interned Japanese friends spark search for descendants

UBC Library connected with families of nine letter writers, still looking for four

Sumi Mototsune, right, with her sisters Teruko, left; Kanako, centre; and Haruye, front. Sumi, who was sent to an internment camp with her family, was one of Joan Parolin’s penpals. The two met at school in Surrey. (Submitted photo: UBC Library)
Surrey-raised Tetsuro Shigematsu wrote and stars in “1 Hour Photo,” a Vancouver Asian Canadian Theatre’s production to be presented online by Surrey Civic Theatres on April 23-24. (submitted photo/Raymond Shum)

‘This Japanese kid who grew up in Whalley’ is thrilled to return with acclaimed ‘1 Hour Photo’

City’s Digital Stage to show Tetsuro Shigematsu’s solo portrait of Mas Yamamoto

Surrey-raised Tetsuro Shigematsu wrote and stars in “1 Hour Photo,” a Vancouver Asian Canadian Theatre’s production to be presented online by Surrey Civic Theatres on April 23-24. (submitted photo/Raymond Shum)