Aukland Airport

Canadians try to sneak cat into New Zealand from YVR, are caught and sent home

A woman had plans to have a nice holiday with her husband in New Zealand – and her cat.

A Canadian woman just pulled an Amber Heard and got caught trying to smuggle her furry friend across international borders.

Authorities say the woman was travelling from Vancouver International Airport to New Zealand when she managed to hide her 4-year-old pet cat Bella in her handbag during a trans-Pacific flight. However, her vacation was cut short when border agents discovered the ruse at a New Zealand airport.

The woman was refused entry into the country and she, her husband and the cat were forced to catch the next flight home, Ministry for Primary Industries spokesman Craig Hughes said Thursday. He called the woman’s actions “reckless and dangerous.”

In the summer, actor Amber Heard was caught illegally bringing her and then-husband Johnny Depp’s dogs into Australia without declaring Pistol and Boo on a private jet.

Like Australia, New Zealand has strict regulations for importing pets. Cats and dogs from most approved countries must have an implanted microchip and be quarantined for a minimum of 10 days after arrival.

Hughes said the couple, both in their mid- to late-20s, managed to conceal the cat from the flight crew and other passengers during the 7,000-mile (11,300-kilometre) flight from Vancouver to Auckland.

“Apparently it was a very quiet cat. Very docile,” Hughes said, adding that it may have been drugged to make it drowsy.

He said the travelling couple said they had nothing to declare upon arrival but border agents then determined their muddy boots needed inspecting. Agents then moved the couple’s bags to an X-ray machine.

Hughes said the woman was “very reluctant” to have her small handbag X-rayed and insisted it had already been checked. She finally admitted there was a cat inside, Hughes said, but then said she’d told a ticketing agent about Bella when she purchased her ticket.

Hughes said even if the woman’s story were true, which he doubted, it was still unacceptable to bring a cat across the border without declaring it. He said foreign cats could bring with them ticks and diseases that aren’t present in New Zealand.

He said the woman got upset about being sent back home.

“She had plans to have a nice holiday with her husband in New Zealand,” Hughes said. “And her cat.”

 

Nick Perry, The Associated Press

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