Prince Harry, Meghan aim to keep baby arrival plans private

Decision means that Harry and Meghan are not likely to pose for the world’s photographers outside of hospital

Prince Harry and his pregnant wife Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, say they have decided to keep plans around their first baby’s arrival private.

Kensington Palace officials said in a statement Thursday that Harry and Meghan “look forward” to sharing the news of their baby’s birth once they have had a chance to celebrate privately as a new family.

The decision means that Harry and Meghan are not likely to pose for the world’s photographers and TV crews on the hospital steps with their newborn, a break from the royal tradition followed by Prince William and his wife Kate, the duchess of Cambridge, when she gave birth to their three children.

As a future king, William is expected to help mark great occasions, while Harry — sixth in the line of succession — has more leeway. Both have in the past expressed deep misgivings about intrusive press coverage.

Harry and Meghan — an American actress best known for her work on “Suits” — wed in May in a spectacular, internationally televised ceremony at Windsor Castle.

They are expecting their first child in late April or early May. The palace press office has announced very few details about their plans, refusing to comment on unconfirmed British press reports that Meghan may opt for a home birth.

Harry and Meghan say they have not learned the gender of their baby.

READ MORE: B.C. residents can bet on royal baby’s arrival date, gender, name and more

The couple recently moved from central London to a more secluded house near their wedding venue.

They recently set up an Instagram account, leading to speculation they may post the first pictures of their baby on that site. That account broke an Instagram record for quickly attracting millions of fans.

They said in their statement they are grateful for the goodwill messages they have received from around the world.

Harry and Meghan have asked people who want to send them baby gifts to instead donate to selected charities for children and parents in need. They mentioned several charities in particular, including The Lunchbox Fund, WellChild, Baby2Baby and Little Village, which all have different connections to the royal couple.

Gregory Katz, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Setting the stage for emerging performers

Variety fundraiser and ongoing open-mics showcase local talent

Four Surrey students head to New Brunswick for Canada-wide science fair

Three projects move to nationals following regional fair at KPU

Man ‘seriously’ injured in crash after driving wrong way on Highway 17: Surrey RCMP

Police say the sedan hit a transport truck, then another car

Easter ‘eggstravaganza’ event planned for South Surrey

Event is to run from 12-3 p.m. at Dufferin Park (17355 2 Ave.).

Delta police arrest four in focus on property crime hot spots

The DPD is using the arrests to highlight the work of its patrol support team

VIDEO: Alberta man creates world’s biggest caricature

Dean Foster is trying to break the world record for a radio show contest

Multiple people injured after deck collapses during celebration

Emergency responders rushed to the Langley home

B.C. RCMP receive application for Police Cat Services

RCMP announced the launch of the Police Cat Services unit as an April fools joke

Rats available for adoption in Vancouver

In a social media post the City of Vancouver says you can adopt a rat for $5.

Kirkland Signature veggie burgers recalled due to possible metal fragments

Recalled products came in 1.7 kg packages with a best before date of Apr. 23, 2019

Chaos at the ferry terminal for people heading from Vancouver to the Island

Easter crowds create backlog at Tsawwassen ferry terminal

Parents of 13 who tortured children get life after hearing victims

One of their daughters fled their home and pleaded for help to a 911 operator

Crews battle Burnaby blaze; 2 people sent to hospital

Emergency Support Services helping residents displaced by fire

Flooding, climate change force Quebecers to rethink relationship with water

Compensation for victims of recurring floods limit to 50% of a home’s value, or a maximum of $100,000

Most Read

l -->