Users of popular FaceApp should be wary of terms of use, experts say

Privacy expert Ann Cavoukian says app can potential share photos and other information with third parties

A social media flood of pictures of computer-aged celebrities, including Drake and Stephen Colbert, has boosted the popularity of the ”FaceApp Challenge,” but also has privacy experts raising concerns about the image-altering service’s expansive terms of use.

The app, which offers a range of facial image manipulations from adding facial hair to changing genders and age, has terms of use that include granting the rights to reproduce, modify, publish and share photos and other user content.

Privacy expert Ann Cavoukian says that while most apps have problematic policies, FaceApp’s potential sharing of photos and other information with third parties are especially concerning.

Cavoukian says users should be wary about apps that share something as personal as one’s face because it may be used in ways users didn’t intend.

The app, launched by a Russian company in 2017, had previously drawn criticism for offering the ability to change the ethnicity of users’ photos, an option the company removed.

FaceApp has issued a statement clarifying that it only uploads photos to the cloud that users have selected, and that for those who don’t want identifying information shared can bypass signing in.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

White Rock Renegades ‘04 named national champs

Girls went undefeated at national tournament in Calgary

PHOTOS: Supercars parade to White Rock

More than a dozen cars were on display for the Drive Project

South Surrey woman promotes exercise to help fight Parkinson’s disease

‘This keeps me strong’ says Liz Holroyd Campbell, organizer of the 2019 Parkinson Superwalk

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

Advocates ‘internationalize’ the fight to free Raif Badawi from Saudi prison

Raif Badawi was arrested on June 17, 2012, and was later sentenced to 1,000 lashes and 10 years in jail for his online criticism of Saudi clerics

Canadian entrepreneurs turning beer byproduct into bread, cookies and profits

Some breweries turn to entrepreneurs looking to turn spent grain into treats for people and their pets

Canada ‘disappointed’ terror suspect’s British citizenship revoked

Jack Letts, who was dubbed “Jihadi Jack” by the U.K. media, has been detained in a Kurdish prison for about two years

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly

There have been months of protests in the semi-autonomous region

B.C. VIEWS: Log exports and my other errors so far in 2019

Plastic bags, legislature overspending turn out differently

Most Read

l -->