The Delta Heritage Society is looking for a little help learning more about some of the items in its collection. (Photos submitted)

Help Delta Heritage Society learn more about items in its collection

DHS is reviewing its collection to prepare for the opening of the new Delta Cultural Centre

The Delta Heritage Society is looking for a little help learning more about some of the items in its collection.

As the society prepares for the eventual opening of the new Delta Cultural Centre, its taking a close look at the items in its collection. This review leads not only to bringing in additional artifacts to tell the most complete version of the community’s story possible, but also removing items that may not be relevant to Delta.

Each item is given careful consideration, and along with an established set of criteria, the society counts on the information provided by the donor when deciding whether an item should be added, retained or removed from the collection.

(For more information on the accessioning and de-accessioning of artifacts, visit deltaheritagesociety.ca.)

Occasionally, DHS comes across an item that might have more of a story than what has so far been provided.

The society wishes to thank Terry Grove and Deanna Griffith, who responded to DHS’s last appeal for information in August. They are the grandchildren of Annie Moore Grove, who was born in Ireland on Jan. 10, 1874, married in England, then came to Canada circa 1913. Grove and her husband settled on a five-acre parcel at 8335 Scott Rd., which was subsequently subdivided for family use.

A portion of the property was later donated for a fire hall, and Griffith’s father, Bill Grove, was the volunteer fire chief in North Delta for many years owing to his proximity to the facility. Bill Grove also ran Grove Insurance on Scott Road.

Griffith recalled that her aunt (Annie Grove’s daughter) donated a couple of sewing machines when she was cleaning out the family home, though Griffith does not recall her grandmother ever sewing.

SEE ALSO: New name for Delta Museum and Archives Society

DHS is now looking for information about the following artifacts. Anyone who can help answer some of the society’s collection questions is asked to contact deltamuseum@delta.ca.

This plane (top-left) was used by Mark Andreason, who was reported to be a boat builder at Gunderson Slough. DHS would like to learn more about the builders at the slough, specifically Mr. Andreason, the companies involved, and the enduring legacy of boat building at Gunderson. Of particular interest would be differences in boat building styles as a result of country of origin.

This bag (top-right) is reported to be made of walrus skin, which is an unusual source for leather. According to the society’s records, it came from the Brouwer family. How was it acquired, and did it have significance to telling the history of the family and their arrival in Delta?

DHS has many pieces of enamel ware, including bowls, plates, and other table setting pieces (bottom-left). These typically indicate use in a working class community, and they were especially important during the Depression years — they were very durable and could not be broken so they were valuable when money and resources were low. Does this story fit with the history of Delta? Do you have memories of enamel ware being used as you were growing up?

The society also has a large collection of carpentry tools which are reported to be from Ray Symonds (bottom-right). These tools include a wide variety of wood planes, which might suggest that Symonds was doing finishing work. In order to properly evaluate these items, DHS would like to know more about his contributions to building in the community, and whether there are existing examples of his work in some of the homes in Delta.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

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