Men’s dormitory in Forum building (now the PNE Forum), Building K, during Japanese Canadian internment and relocation in 1942. (City of Vancouver Archives photo)

Men’s dormitory in Forum building (now the PNE Forum), Building K, during Japanese Canadian internment and relocation in 1942. (City of Vancouver Archives photo)

SERIES: Commemorating North Delta’s lost Japanese-Canadian community

Delta Museum and Archives Society marks 75th anniversary of internment of Japanese-Canadians in WW2

This year marks the 75th anniversary of the internment of tens of thousands of people of Japanese descent by the Canadian Government during the Second World War. Though few people may be aware of it today, North Delta once had a thriving Japanese community before racism and the fear of “enemy aliens” operating along our coast robbed them of their property and livelihoods.

To commemorate this dark chapter in our shared history, several members of the Delta Museum and Archives Society contributed to this month’s North Delta History feature to help shed light on the Japanese Canadians who helped build North Delta in those pre-war years.

Check out all four parts of the series below:

PART ONE:Japanese settlement pre-World War Two,” by Nancy Demwell and John Macdonald

PART TWO:Japanese internment during the Second World War,” by Nancy Demwell and John Macdonald

PART THREE:‘Picture brides’ were part of the fabric of Japanese-Canadian community,” by Nancy Demwell, John MacDonald and Len Stroh

PART FOUR:Japanese-Canadian history hits home,” by Mark Boyter

RELATED:‘Gumboot Navy’ patrolled local shores during the Second World War,” by Nancy Demwell

 

Japanese-Canadians were transported to internment camps like this one at Tashme (now called Sunshine Valley, near the Hope Slide) in open bed trucks. (UBC Archives photo)

Japanese-Canadians were transported to internment camps like this one at Tashme (now called Sunshine Valley, near the Hope Slide) in open bed trucks. (UBC Archives photo)