Jane Hayes, chair of the KPU music department, said rally participants should write the Ministry of Advanced Education to lobby for increased funding for post-secondary education across the province. Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

Kwantlen Polytechnic University faces $12 million shortfall

University president says by law, KPU budget must be balanced

Kwantlen Polytechnic University has a $12-million “gap” and it has to, by law, balance its budget, KPU president and vice-chancellor Dr. Alan Davis said.

Davis told the Langley Advance Times the university has planned a $226-million balanced budget for 2019-20 that will be about $23 million larger than the year before.

“KPU’s budget for 2019-20 is projected to be larger … but with the university’s expenditures increasing faster than its revenue, there was a forecast gap of about $12 million, which we needed to close [in order] to deliver a balanced budget as required by legislation,” Davis explained.

There has been a search for savings across the university, Davis elaborated, including a “net reduction” in administration positions and a 2.2 per cent cut in the number of classes KPU offers.

Davis said the measures won’t affect the number of students attending classes.

“Through careful enrolment management, KPU intends to maintain existing student enrolment, using our resources to maximize the number of students we can serve and reduce waitlists for high demand programs.”

One of the budget measures involved the Langley-based music program, which was thrown into turmoil in February when the university announced admissions had been cancelled for the fall 2019, spring 2020, and summer 2020 intakes.

READ MORE: Langley university defends its cuts to music program

A student-led campaign against the cuts filled Douglas Park in Langley City with music on Sunday.

Between music program student performances that included a wind symphony orchestra, Motown band, brass quintet and jazz combo, different speakers took the stage to promote the program and decry budget-cutting that led the university to cancel first-year music admissions.

Kwantlen Music Students’ Association (KMSA) president Emma Dotto said the goal of the rally was “to make a noise” and shed some light on the issue.

“We’re going to fight as much as we can,” Dotto said.

Dotto drew cheers when she announced an online petition, the change.org “Reconsider Cuts to KPU’s Music Program,” had passed the 10,000 mark.

About 200 attended the rally, including Langley City Mayor Val van den Broek and her husband Rob, who are both Kwantlen graduates, but did not attend the music program.

“We’re here to support it, because music is a huge part of our community and it needs to continue,” the mayor said.

“We need to have opportunities for young kids coming up from high school to attend a local university for a music program,” she added.

Rob van den Broek, who plays in a band with some Kwantlen music students, called the program “invaluable to the community.”

Langley City councillor Rosemary Wallace said she was there because she believes in the arts.

“I just feel like the arts are the first to get cut,” Wallace said.

READ MORE: Music students at Kwantlen Polytechnic University battle cuts

Stuart Martin, music director and conductor of the Surrey City Orchestra, who guided the orchestra performance, called the decision to freeze admissions “a shame.”

“The education we get [at KPU] is beyond amazing,” said Martin, who studied at KPU for two years.

Jane Hayes, chair of the KPU music department, said rally participants should write the Ministry of Advanced Education and demand increased funding for all post-secondary education across the province.

“Education can’t be about breaking even,” Hayes said.

Port Moody music teacher Andrew Clark said the program connects aspiring musicians to a larger community of musicians.

“Without this connection, we don’t have that community,” Clark said.

“It’s amazing that they would take something successful like that and cut it off at the knees,” Clark added.

Meanwhile, a message from the Kwantlen Faculty Association political action committee to all association members said instructors at the university “are largely being excluded” from the budgeting process.

“The only employee group at KPU seeing a reduction is faculty,” the statement said.

“This is not a “scarcity” budget, except for faculty members and programs.”

 

Kwantlen Music Students’ Association (KMSA) Emma Dotto (left) sang at the rally. Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times Kwantlen Music Students’ Association (KMSA) Emma Dotto sang at the rally. Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

The KPU Chorus, led by Gail Suderman, delivered a classic spin on modern songs, including Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” and the Beatles’ “Let It Be.” Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times The KPU Chorus, led by Gail Suderman, delivered a classic spin on modern songs, including Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” and the Beatles’ “Let It Be.” Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

Alan Davis says KPU has a $12 million dollar funding shortfall and by law must balance its budget. File photo

Langley City councillor Rosemary Wallace said she was there because she believes in the arts. Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

Darrell Knell, whose son Nolan studied music at Kwantlen, said the program provides “a foot in the door” for aspiring musicians. Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

Langley City mayor Val van den Broek and husband Rob said they were there to support the program. Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

Conductor Stuart Martin guides a group of KPU music students at an afternoon rally against funding cuts to the Langley-based program. Martin, music director and conductor of the Surrey City Orchestra, called the decision to freeze admissions “a shame.” Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

Just Posted

Surrey Board of Trade fears SkyTrain expansion will impede other transit needs

‘We need transit improvements in all of Surrey,’ Anita Huberman says

Surrey RCMP, firefighters support Cloverdale boy’s lonely lemonade stand

Parker, 7, had few takers until Surrey first responders heard his call

North Delta Secondary teacher up for B.C. education award

Prabhjot Grewal is up for a Premier’s Award for Excellence in Education in the Outstanding New Teacher category

Public hearing set for two Surrey modular housing projects for homeless

Surrey council set to vote Monday on projects in Guildford, Whalley

Rich the Vegan scoots across Canada for the animals

Rich Adams is riding his push scooter across Canada to bring awareness to the dog meat trade in Asia

Recall: Certain Pacific oysters may pose threat of paralytic shellfish poisoning

Consumers urged to either return affected packages or throw them out

How a Kamloops-born man helped put us on the moon

Jim Chamberlin did troubleshooting for the Apollo program, which led to its success

Sexual harassment complaints soaring amid ‘frat boy culture’ in Canada’s airline industry

‘It’s a #MeToo dumpster fire…and it’s exhausting for survivors’

How much do you know about the moon?

To mark the 50th anniversary of the first lunar landing, see how well you know space

Body, burning truck found near northern B.C. town

RCMP unsure if the two separate discoveries are related

Former Fernie Ghostrider re-signs with Vancouver Canucks

Josh Teves has signed a two-year contract with the NHL team

Couple found dead along northern B.C. highway in double homicide

Woman from the U.S. and man from Australia found dead near Liard Hot Springs

Most Read

l -->