A backlit Peace Arch is enshrouded in a white wrap, as restoration work continues. The monument is being blasted and repainted during the process, which is expected to continue until September and include restoration of its plaques and ornamental gates. (Contributed photo)

A backlit Peace Arch is enshrouded in a white wrap, as restoration work continues. The monument is being blasted and repainted during the process, which is expected to continue until September and include restoration of its plaques and ornamental gates. (Contributed photo)

Restoration work puts Peace Arch under wraps

Border monument being repainted, restored

The Peace Arch monument is getting a facelift.

Currently under wraps – literally wrapped in what appears to be a white plastic cover – the structure which marks the international border between Canada and the U.S. at the Douglas port is in the process of being vapour-blasted, primed, painted and restored.

According to an alert on the BC Parks website, the work got underway July 16 and is expected to continue until September.

In addition to a fresh coat of paint, the arch’s inscriptions are being restored, as are its ornamental gates and commemorative plaques.

“Please note the arch may not be visible during this time due to the need to wrap the structure to contain removed paint and protect the work,” the alert notes.

A spokesman for BC Parks added that signage has been erected at the park to explain the work, and that BC Parks assists with planned repairs in partnership with the State Park.

Located in Peace Arch Provincial Park – which remains closed in an effort to help curb the spread of COVID-19 – the Peace Arch was dedicated in 1921 as a symbol of lasting peace between Canada and the U.S.

READ MORE: Influx of cross-border visitors to Peace Arch Park sparks concern COVID-19 could spike

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tholmes@peacearchnews.com

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