A passenger train rolls along the White Rock waterfront.

A passenger train rolls along the White Rock waterfront.

Semiahmoo Peninsula MP, MLA question track-move viability

Discussions welcomed after proposal to relocate railway off White Rock, Surrey waterfront.

When it comes to possibly relocating train tracks off the Semiahmoo Peninsula waterfront, municipal, provincial and federal politicians are on board with the idea of improving safety.

But while local politicians are quick to back the concept, MP Russ Hiebert offered scant hope – from a federal angle – that it will happen anytime soon.

There are “a couple of obvious hurdles to jump,” Hiebert (South Surrey-White Rock-Cloverdale) said by email Friday.

White Rock Mayor Wayne Baldwin announced last week that Surrey and White Rock officials have been working since August to create a business case for relocating the tracks off the waterfront.

The topic is to be front-and-centre tonight (Tuesday), at a joint community forum on railway safety.

Baldwin and Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts are to speak, and information gathered to date on possible options is to be shared.

Hiebert said cost and neighbourhood opposition are two significant hurdles in the equation. He estimated the “tremendous” cost at $400-500 million (Baldwin last week estimated the cost to be $350-400 million), and said governments would have to come up with the funds before rail-line owner BNSF would even consider relocation.

Residents of neighbourhoods proposed for a new rail line likely won’t be any happier with the idea than those who currently want it gone from their backyards, he added.

Surrey-White Rock MLA Gordon Hogg said while relocating the line is “a nice vision” that he personally supports, he questioned the practicality of the move.

“My first preference is relocation of the coal and the dangerous goods,” he said, citing health of the community and environment.

“The rest of it is all about livability.”

A proposal by Fraser Surrey Docks that would increase coal-train traffic along the waterfront has been a recent driver behind concerns with the century-old railway’s route. Recent tragedies, including the Lac-Mégantic derailment and the death of a White Rock jogger, have only heightened those concerns.

Hogg recalled discussions in the late 1980s – prior to development of White Rock’s promenade – of putting the rail bed underground.

It didn’t go ahead because of the associated costs, Hogg said.

“Certainly if we had a blank slate to work with today, no one would be proposing a train along our waterfront.”

White Rock council members say they have no doubt it is time to relocate the line.

“There’s been a combination of events that lead you to think… could there be a better way, could there be a better route?” Coun. Helen Fathers said, noting she has always been shocked by the line’s proximity to the waterfront.

“I think it bears looking at. I think there could be a genuine case made for moving it.”

At the same time, Fathers is concerned about simply making the matter someone else’s problem.

“I am very conscious of are we just going to be passing it on,” she said.

Couns. Al Campbell and Bill Lawrence said much has changed since the line was first built, in terms of what is being transported and how often.

“It’s time to do it, for safety issues, for many, many reasons. Just the quantity on that one little rail line, meandering around, across the trestle, doesn’t make sense to anybody,” Campbell said. “Hopefully we can get it done within the next five years.”

“Society has changed, and accordingly, the railway should change,” said Lawrence.

Coun. Larry Robinson described relocation of the tracks as a proactive step that would lessen the risks to citizens and trains alike, while enabling rail traffic to move with speeds and quantities that make economic sense.

Coun. Louise Hutchinson said she sees trains “rocking and rolling” every day as they pass her White Rock home. She described the heavier trains as a particular hazard to bluff homes in Ocean Park, citing “vibration erosion” that adds to wind and water erosion that threatens slope stability.

She also has concerns with the volatility of some trains’ cargo, which she said the Lac-Mégantic tragedy proved is often not properly disclosed.

Hutchinson said coal trains are the “tip of the iceberg.”

“Rail relocation should and must be the real problem to tackle,” she said.

Hogg said “good, rational discussion” is essential.

“If there’s a safer way to do this and it’s something that we can afford, it’s something we should be doing.”

Tuesday’s forum is set for 7-8:30 p.m. at the Pacific Inn, 1160 King George Blvd.

 

Just Posted

Hundreds gathered at Surrey’s Holland Park Friday (June 11) in memory of the Muslim family killed in London, Ont. on Sunday (June 6). (Photo: Shane MacKichan)
Educating public ‘exhausting,’ says White Rock Muslim Association past president

Asad Syed says public needs to be more vocal in their condemnation

The City of White Rock turns 63 today. (file photo)
City of White Rock 2020 annual report available for review

Report to be discussed at June 28 council meeting

People were lined up around the fields at a drop-in vaccine clinic at Newton Athletic Park on Tuesday (April 27, 2021), which is one of the high-transmission neighbourhoods that are being given vaccine priority. This clinic was one of at least three to open in the city on Tuesday. (Photo: Lauren Collins)
Surrey’s weekly cases continue to drop, push for 80% vaccination rate citywide

BCCDC reports 263 cases for Surrey the week of May 30 to June 5

Fleetwood Park Secondary School’s 2021 commencement ceremonies were held over the course of two days, June 10 and 11. Grads went through a small, distanced ceremony in groups of four, with up to four members of the grad’s household. (Photo: Lauren Collins)
Surrey’s 2021 grads find creative ways to celebrate in another year of COVID-19

This year’s Grade 12 students were unable to have any large-scale events

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

Premier John Horgan speaks as provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, right, and health minister Adrian Dix look on during a press conference to update on the province’s fall pandemic preparedness plan during a press conference from the press theatre at Legislature in Victoria, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. officials to provide details on Step 2 of COVID reopening plan Monday

Step 2 could allow for larger gatherings and a resumption of recreational travel

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller is seen during a news conference, Wednesday May 19, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Indigenous child-welfare battle heads to court despite calls for Ottawa to drop cases

Feds are poised to argue against two Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race has been held in Summerland as a fundraising event. Do you know which Canadian city introduced this sport? (Black Press file photo)
QUIZ: A summer’s day at the water

How much do you know about boats, lakes and water?

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

Most Read