The 2017 Surrey Civic Treasures award winners were Jim Trimble (left), Robert Gary Parkes and Heidi Greco. (File photo: Tom Zillich)

Surrey moves to overhaul its civic awards program, merging some and dropping others

The new Civic Distinction Awards name ‘better identifies the intent of the awards,’ report says

The City of Surrey is overhauling its civic awards program, which has a new name and involves the merger or elimination of some awards and categories.

The rebranded Civic Distinction Awards Program will now kick into gear, following a council vote Monday (Oct. 7) to have staff start planning a process and ceremony for 2020, as part of a four-year cycle instead of three.

A review of Surrey’s previous City Awards Program identified duplication and gaps in categories for seven awards, including honours for Beautiful City, Clean Energy, Sport Tourism, Heritage, New City Design and Heart in the City.

In addition to those, the city has facilitated four annual awards, including Good Citizen of the Year, Surrey Civic Treasure, SASSY (or Service Above Self Surrey Youth) and Outdoor Sport Volunteer Appreciation.

In June, a City Speaks survey of 872 people found 49 per cent of respondents were aware of the City Awards program, while 51 per cent were not.

For award awareness and importance, the Good Citizen honour scored top marks, while the Civic Treasure, New City Design and Heart of the City awards were deemed lowest on the importance scale.

Moving forward, according to a report to the council, “a multi-faceted marketing/communications strategy will accompany the name change to reach target audiences, ensure a high volume of nominations are received and enhance recognition in the community.”

Also, the new Civic Distinction Awards name “better identifies the intent of the awards and adds prestige to the program,” the report says. “The individual award names should also be reviewed to ensure a colloquial level of understanding of each award or category.”

CLICK HERE to read the full report to council.

To streamline things, the Clean Energy award will be eliminated, the Surrey Civic Treasures and Heritage in the City awards will be merged, and a new category for public art will be created under the New City Design Award, “as there is now a substantial inventory of public art available for assessment.” Also, as a pilot, a new category of Historic and Legacy Commercial Business will be created under the Heritage in the City Award.

As for costs, the report says $75,000 was spent to develop and administer the City Awards program, and staff will now draft a budget for the rebranded Civic Distinction Awards.

• RELATED STORY, from 2018: VIDEO: Foulkes, Charles join Surrey Civic Treasures club.

Every fall since 2008, winners of Surrey’s Civic Treasures award have been announced at a Business & the Arts reception held at Surrey Arts Centre, but the event won’t be held this year. The award celebrates “Surrey’s highest achievers in the cultural sector,” including 2018 recipients Jim Foulkes and Roxanne Charles.



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Tom on Twitter

Just Posted

B.C. rider wins J.C. Anderson Legacy Medal to become national champion

South Surrey resident Emma Woo trains in Langley

Cloverdale ‘Ladies’ Night Out’ shopping event expected to draw thousands

Annual event kicks off the holiday shopping season in downtown Cloverdale

South Surrey’s A Rocha Canada an agriculture-leader finalist

Surrey Board of Trade industry event set for Nov. 21

Surrey latest city to denounce Quebec’s Bill 21

The bill bans public workers from wearing religious symbols while working

Surrey RCMP say three people deported in connection to brawl caught on video

Police say they have been ‘actively engaged’ in the issue of youth fights in Newton since March

Bye bye Bei Bei: Giant panda born in U.S. zoo heads to China

Panda heads back to China as part of cooperative breeding program

B.C. to advocate for frustrated, confused, unhappy cellphone users, says premier

Maple Ridge New Democrat Bob D’Eith to advocate for more affordable and transparent cellphone options

B.C. man who killed Belgian tourist near Boston Bar gets life in prison, no parole until 2042

Sean McKenzie pleaded guilty to second-degree murder of 28-year-old Amelie Christelle Sakkalis

Workers union calls strike vote in SkyTrain labour dispute

Mediated talks are scheduled to begin Nov. 28

‘Very disrespectful’: B.C. first responder irked by motorists recording collisions on cellphones

Central Cariboo Search and Rescue deputy chief challenges motorists to break the habit

Daily cannabis linked to reduction in opioid use: B.C. researchers

Researchers looked at a group of 1,152 people in Vancouver who reported substance use and chronic pain

Bids down, costs up on Highway 1, B.C. independent contractors say

Rally protests NDP government’s union-only public construction

Members of little people community applaud change to drop ‘midget’ term

‘It’s not about sensitivity,’ says Allan Redford, the president of the Little People of Canada

Most Read

l -->