An example of a Surrey Police cruiser, showcased at Mayor Doug McCallum’s State of the City Address at Civic Hotel in May of 2019. (File photo: Amy Reid)

An example of a Surrey Police cruiser, showcased at Mayor Doug McCallum’s State of the City Address at Civic Hotel in May of 2019. (File photo: Amy Reid)

Surrey Police Service hires first three inspectors as ‘next layer of leadership’

Three men have more than 80 years of combined experience

The Surrey Police Service has hired its first three inspectors.

Earl Andersen, Steve Drennan and Ryan Hall have been announced as the first three inspectors “that will be supporting the Executive Management Team in leading and guiding the organization within the three bureaus of the SPS,” reads a release Thursday (March 4).

The three men combined have 80 years of experience.

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Andersen is currently an inspector in charge of the traffic section with the Vancouver Police Department, with 30-plus years of police service.

Drennan has more than 25 years of experience, coming from the Calgary Police Department.

Hall hails from Delta Police Department, where he has served for more than 25 years, currently overseeing the Community Support Section.

“It is inspiring to me the depth of character and skill sets that each of these officers possess,” Chief Constable Norm Lipinski said in the release. “Their wide-ranging backgrounds and experience will serve the organization and our citizens very well.”

SPS will now focus “on establishing the recruiting unit within the Support Service Bureau.

“Surrey Police Service continues to build the senior leadership structure in preparation for recruiting the rank and file in the coming months,” the release notes.

Meantime, Kyle Friesen, current legal advisor to the RCMP in B.C., will be joining the SPS on April 1, in the role of in-house legal counsel and member of the executive leadership team.

A Surrey resident, Friesen “will take an active role in ensuring SPS meets both its legal obligations and the high standards of conduct, practices, and ethics it has set for itself,” according to a news release Tuesday (March 9).

Friesen is described as “a well-respected member of Canadian law-enforcement community, having dedicated the past 22 years of his career to the administration of federal and provincial laws and municipal bylaws,” the release says.

with a file from Tom Zillich

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