Surrey school district’s office. (File photo)

Top earners in Surrey school district revealed

Superintendent Jordan Tinney received more than $330K in total compensation in last fiscal year

The Surrey School District’s top five earners have been revealed in an annual compensation disclosure report.

The totals provided are for the 2016/2017 fiscal year, which ended June 30, 2017.

Superintendent Jordan Tinney was the district’s top earner, who received a $246,705 salary, $9,081 in benefits and $34,474 in pension contributions.

Tinney also received $44,573 in “other compensation,” including $24,870 in vacation payout and $19,703 as a vehicle allowance.

All told, Tinney’s total compensation for the year was $334,833, up more than $36,000 from the $298,468 he earned the prior fiscal year (2015/2016) and $264,106 in 2014/2015.

Coming in second was secretary-treasurer Wayne D. Noye, who received $17,351 in salary due to his departure from the district on July 31, 2016 but who received $412,292 in “other compensation” which included $329,872 in severance equivalent to 18 months’ salary and benefits in a lump sum, as well as $79,572 in vacation payout, in accordance with the terms of his contract.

See also: Laurie Larsen elected as new Surrey Board of Education chair

See also: Surrey union decries ‘epidemic’ level shortage of education assistants in B.C.

See more: ‘Troublesome’ on-call teacher shortage in Surrey

He also received $298 in benefits and $1,728 in pension contributions.

Noye’s total compensation for the fiscal year was $431,660.

Deputy Superintendent Rick Ryan was the third highest earner, with a total compensation of $240,821, which included $184,003 in salary, $6,833 in benefits, $25,501 in pension contributions and $24,484 in “other compensation,” which included $12,377 in vacation payout and a $6,000 vehicle allowance.

Next was Secretary Treasurer Greg Frank with $211,377 in total compensation, including $166,959 in salary, $12,970 in benefits, $16,602 in pension and $14,846 in a vehicle allowance.

Finally, Assistant Superintendent Catherine Sereda received a total compensation of $195,670, including a salary of $151,700, $4,715 in benefits, $20,878 in pension, and $18,377 in other compensation (including $12,377 in vacation payout and $6,000 as a vehicle allowance).



amy.reid@surreynowleader.com

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