TransLink directors plan to mull over a 2.3 per cent fare increase at a board meeting this Thursday (March 25) to keep up with service costs amid declined ridership and COVID-19 space restrictions. (TransLink)

TransLink directors plan to mull over a 2.3 per cent fare increase at a board meeting this Thursday (March 25) to keep up with service costs amid declined ridership and COVID-19 space restrictions. (TransLink)

TransLink contemplating 2.3% fare hike to account for lost ridership

If approved, adult one-zone fares would jump to $3.05 from $3, monthly passes from $98 to $100.25

You might have to pay more to take public transit in Metro Vancouver this year.

TransLink directors plan to mull over a 2.3 per cent fare increase at a board meeting this Thursday (March 25) to keep up with service costs amid declined ridership and COVID-19 space restrictions.

The price hike is down from the 4.1 per cent originally forecast for 2021.

In 2917 annual fare increases were approved as part of a coordinated “10-Year Vision” from Metro Vancouver mayors to help fund transit improvements and infrastructure in the region.

However, when the provincial government granted TransLink $644 million last year under its Safe Restart Agreement – it made the company pledge to hold fare increases at 2.3 per cent until 2024.

RELATED: Upset arises over TransLink using B.C. restart funds to reinstate pay cut of CEO, executives

The price hike, if implemented, would see an adult one-zone fare jump to $3.05 from $3. Monthly passes would climb from $98 to $100.25. Single concession fares would go from $2 to $1.95 and a monthly pass, from $56 to $57.30.

The proposed fare increase is expected to generate about $4 million per year. It would go into effect this July.

READ MORE: ‘Self-disinfecting’ copper coming to more of TransLink’s fleet to fight COVID-19



sarah.grochowski@bpdigital.ca

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