Using an image of a cougar, a sign at a park in Langley shows visitors what two metres looks like, in order to help them keep an appropriate distance between themselves and others when using the park. (Contributed photo)

Using an image of a cougar, a sign at a park in Langley shows visitors what two metres looks like, in order to help them keep an appropriate distance between themselves and others when using the park. (Contributed photo)

LETTERS: Animal signs ideal for physical distance visualization

Perhaps White Rock and Surrey can follow the rather clever lead of Langley

Editor:

Re: Pier crowding not yet cause for closure, June 25

“We want to work with the people, but we want to give them a chance.”

I agree with Mayor Walker’s sentiments.

Perhaps White Rock and Surrey can follow the rather clever lead of Langley, perhaps substituting a Steller sea lion for Langley’s cougar. The key is to post the sign in the middle of the entrance to the pier and at locations along the promenade, so that folks can experience the meaning of two metres by having to walk around it.

Surrey could do the same at Crescent Beach and Crescent Park – maybe stick the cougar back in for the park.

I remember remarking that kids in playgrounds back in February thought that six inches was six feet.

My walks about town tell me that adults also have spatial challenges, including the 14 young guys running in a long line of pairs on each others’ heels through Centennial and Ruth Johnson Parks and eventually along the promenade. Let’s help everyone with two-metre indicators. The cougar sure got my attention. So would a Steller sea lion.

Roger Elmes, White Rock

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