Letter writers commiserate with resident Kelley McNamara who has difficulty accepting White Rock’s tree rules.

Letter writers commiserate with resident Kelley McNamara who has difficulty accepting White Rock’s tree rules.

LETTERS: City needs to turn over new leaf

Editor:

Re: Policy has more bite than bark, May 20 letters; Reactions vary to tree letter, May 27 letters.

Editor:

Re: Policy has more bite than bark, May 20 letters; Reactions vary to tree letter, May 27 letters.

The city tree bylaw needs some common sense applied.

Asking a homeowner to plant multiple trees to replace an old and diseased tree is absurd.

The hillside lots in White Rock are small and cannot support the healthy growth of many trees. Better that the city have fewer healthy plants and trees rather than plant much greenery that is not cared for!

A cherry tree that has grown to excess height and is diseased does nothing to enhance the neighbourhood and is of no benefit – except to crows, raccoons, rats and other vermin who feed on the rotting fruit. Look around, I believe we have enough problems with rats that carry various disease.

To the letter-writer who proposes that we learn to live with raccoons, I suggest this would not be healthy for young children who might accidentally disturb a raccoon that can be quite vicious if it were protecting its food or babies. I would not want to be responsible for a young child or adult for that matter, being attacked.

Are we supposed to lock the children inside? Or watch them every minute? Has that person ever had raccoons or squirrels in his attic?

To council, please revisit the tree bylaw and apply common sense to planting trees on small lots. This should be based on the area available to support the plants and allow the homeowner some yard to enjoy.

Ken Linklater, White Rock

• • •

After reading Perry Walker’s “koombaya” letter to the editor, I have to wonder. If one lives in a forested area, I agree to be one with nature. Live and let live.

But consider the damage these creatures do to a residential yard. Even their deposits are extremely toxic, let alone if pets and children are around. They chew up shingles. They tear anything up and eat anything they see.

I and my neighbours have spent hundreds of dollars fixing up their destruction. Ommmm!

As far as this cash grab for an arborist to assess something that is obvious – and charge the customer for it, when it’s the City of White Rock that ordered it – is ridiculous. And to demand that five trees be replanted to replace the rotten and hazardous one is another cash grab and I question the legality of such a demand.

The citizen is trying to make her property – her little piece of heaven – safe, but instead is met by roadblocks because she decided to go the permit route, not to mention the outrageous deposit she is requested to make for the new trees. What is city hall doing to their citizens besides causing anguish and conflict?

I’m on the other side of the fence. I had a hazardous tree and three others of the same kind. The City of Surrey sent out their guy; that cost me nothing. Gave me a permit; that cost me nothing. I hired a tree-removal company and took down all the trees to avoid future problems, which the city was OK with, and I was never ordered to replant or had to put any money on hold for a year.

I feel the original letter writer is being bullied and not respected for her conscientious action.

Patricia Seggie, Surrey

 

 

Just Posted

All nine White Rock Renegades softball teams are set to take part in the Canadian Pride and Power Tournament, scheduled for July 1-4. (Aaron Hinks photo)
White Rock Renegades set to host multi-team Pride and Power softball tournament

‘There’s going to be a lot of excitement in the park,’ said Greg Timm

Dooris Raad was last seen in South Surrey’s Ocean Park neighbourhood on June 7. (Surrey RCMP photo)
Doris Anderson’s digital triptych Aberration, which she is marketing as an NFT.
Semiahmoo Peninsula abstract painter dives into NFT market

Works sold as one-of-a-kind digital files

Hundreds gathered at Surrey’s Holland Park Friday (June 11) in memory of the Muslim family killed in London, Ont. on Sunday (June 6). (Photo: Shane MacKichan)
Hundreds gather at Surrey park in memory of victims in London attack

Vigil organized by Committee of Progressive Pakistani Canadians

Scales of Justice, Image courtesy Creative Outlet
Scales of Justice, Image courtesy Creative Outlet
Teacher’s elbow injury case against Surrey School District, WorkSafeBC struck by judge

Judge says processes put in place by legislation, collective agreement must be followed

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

Denmark’s Christian Eriksen receives medical attention after collapsing during the Euro 2020 soccer championship group B match between Denmark and Finland at Parken stadium in Copenhagen, Saturday, June 12, 2021. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, Pool)
Denmark soccer player Christian Eriksen collapses during game against Finland

Eriksen was given chest compressions after collapsing on the field during a European Championship

Members of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans’ Marine Mammal Response Program rescued an adult humpback what that was entangled in commercial fishing gear in the waters off of Entrance Island on Thursday, June 10. (Photo courtesy Marine Mammal Response Program)
Rescuers free humpback ‘anchored’ down by prawn traps off Vancouver Island

Department of Fisheries and Oceans responders spend hours untangling whale

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

As stories of the horrors of residential schools circulate after the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc First Nation announced it had located what are believed to be the remains of 215 children, Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs said he feels a connection with the former students. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
2 sides of the same coin: Ex-foster kids identify with residential school survivors

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip says the child welfare system takes Indigenous children from their families

Nathan Watts, a member of the Tseshaht First Nation near Port Alberni, shares his story of substance use, a perspective he said isn’t seen enough. (Photo courtesy of Nathan Watts)
Public shaming, hate perpetuates further substance use: UVic researcher

Longtime addict Nathan Watts offers a user’s perspective on substance use

57-year-old Kathleen Richardson was discovered deceased in her home Wednesday, June 9, 2021. Her death is considered a homicide and connected to the slain brothers found on a Naramata forest road. (Submitted)
Condolences pour in for Kathy Richardson, Naramata’s 3rd homicide victim in recent weeks

Richardson was well liked in the community, a volunteer firefighter with a home-based salon

A person receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
More than 75% of B.C. adults have 1st dose of COVID vaccine

The federal government has confirmed a boost in the Moderna vaccine will be coming later this month

Most Read