LETTERS: Mixed views over decisions

Editor:

I am disappointed that trees and shrubs were clearcut on the hillside as you walk from the pier to east beach.

Editor:

I am disappointed that trees and shrubs were clearcut on the hillside as you walk from the pier to east beach (Tree stands alone, Dec. 2).

As I walked down the pathway, I came across one worker who gave me his explanation. He told me that with the instability of some trees where water could uplift them from the roots, it could be dangerous for the railway and passersby.

This worker explained the railway took over a large section of land in 1902, and that it encompasses from the waterfront up to the centre line of Marine Drive. In other words, the railway can do whatever they choose.

He said the longest living tree was 30 years old. They seemed to have survived and were stable for many years, so why destroy them now?

And if the trees had to go due to the instability, why hasn’t the railway clear cut the embankment west of the promenade – also on a hill?

I am sure that the shrubs posed no danger, yet they were cut down.  That section should have been considered a bird sanctuary.

If the explanation is true, why hasn’t the public been informed? It feels like there is more to this than we know.

Robert Barnes, White Rock

• • •

As a citizen of White Rock and a several-times-a-week walker on the sidewalk above the promenade, I would like to commend the village for clearing the slope and opening the magnificent view to all passersby.

I’m sure non-ambulatory citizens and visitors that can only drive by also appreciate the improvements.

To observe an eagle hunting early last Sunday morning was a joy.

It’s difficult to imagine the group that made the decision to cut brush and clear garbage from ‘the hump’ is the same one that decided to pay a yet-to-be determined amount – let me guess, north of $30 million – to purchase the water supply, not to mention the ongoing financial liability for staffing, care and maintenance, when they could have hooked into the GVWD’s supply for $20 million (Metro water costs still not public, Nov. 27)? Go figure!

Don MacKay, White Rock

• • •

I have read all the letters regarding the removal of green space around the Peninsula, and notice that most green spaces now have a green sign indicating ‘development proposal’.

Even our most cherished jewel, the waterfront, has now been totally butchered to give better views.

Could it be that our city officials are trying to turn our beautiful Peninsula into another downtown Vancouver to attract only the wealthy?

It also seems that more and more secrets are being kept from taxpayers.

First it was the change to private garbage collection – which now totally pollutes our city – the clearcut of the waterfront, the constant need to change our OCP, and now the buying of the water utility.

As a city taxpayer, I totally resent being kept in the dark.

Cheryl Berti, White Rock

 

 

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