Letter writers take issue with the railway ties lining the waterfront as part of a BNSF replacement project staring next week. Tracy Holmes photo

Letter writers take issue with the railway ties lining the waterfront as part of a BNSF replacement project staring next week. Tracy Holmes photo

LETTERS: Railway work must be opposed

Editor: Last week, thousands of creosote-soaked railway ties were dumped trackside.

Editor:

Last week, thousands of creosote-soaked railway ties were dumped trackside.

In addition to the atrocious stench that stings the nose and throat, these highly toxic, carcinogen-laden ties are within a few feet of a beach frequented by tens of thousands of children every summer.

Scandalous insanity.

Paul Griffin, Surrey

• • •

An open letter to White Rock council.

I’m very disappointed to see thousands of newly treated railroad ties piled up along the railroad right-of-way in White Rock.

Someone on city staff must know how toxic these ties are and how they will be toxic for decades. Not only are the chemicals impregnated into this wood toxic, they are also carcinogenic.

They cannot be used around gardens or playgrounds and the vapours that are released from these ties are also toxic.

Even after leaching these chemicals into the environment for decades you must get a permit to dispose of them and pay a higher fee due to the fact that they are still dangerous.

Also, these ties are more expensive than concrete ties, less durable and cannot handle the same loads. They are used simply because the railroads haul a lot of wood and these customers want the railroads to use wood ties.

This situation is like building a pipeline without insulation. Much more energy is needed to pump the oil but using more energy is the name of the game. In both cases, the economics are worse for society, worse for the environment while a few selfish people make more money.

This process is called crapitalism, and the City of White Rock should not be part of it.

If you choose to reply, please do not tell me these ties are on railroad property and that you have no input. If the toxins stayed on railroad property you might have a point, but they do not. They will end up on our beaches, in the bay, in the wildlife and in the bodies of numerous citizens.

Bob Fearn, White Rock