Letter writers address evolving noise issues that have affected residents in both White Rock and South Surrey.

Letter writers address evolving noise issues that have affected residents in both White Rock and South Surrey.

LETTERS: Sounds of concern in our cities

Letter writers address evolving noise issues that have affected residents in both White Rock and South Surrey.

Editor:

What happened to peaceful White Rock?

Twenty-five years ago we purchased a hillside home, our dreams came true. We could sit on the deck, enjoy the sea breezes, the quiet and know all our neighbours.

How things have changed, especially the last few years.

We now listen to continuous horn blowing from the trains – and the latest annoyance, the helicopter patrolling the waterfront all day long – all because our mayor thought he could get brownie points taking on Burlington Northern and Transport Canada when a couple of careless folks got in the way of a train, a no-win situation.

This railway was here when we bought, and way before our mayor took office, and we never had problems adjusting. There is always going to be accidents, whether on 16 Avenue, Highway 99 or the railway. People are ultimately responsible for their safety. We teach our kids to look both ways; adults should remember that.

This rail line will not be relocated in my lifetime, or yours, so get used to it.

Stephen McKeever, White Rock

• • •

On July 29, I was rudely catapulted out of bed at 5 a.m., the horn of the BNSF once again. That was already after three days that this had been repeated.

I had only had five hours sleep and I was distraught. I waited a few hours before contacting the BNSF, where I was shuffled from one department to the other, only to be kept waiting and eventually be hung up on. I finally gave up as I felt it was futile to try to get someone to listen.

Lo and behold, I picked up PAN and noticed the letter, Thoughts on Noise Pollution (July 29). Thank you, Ole Nygard, for your letter on noise pollution. I finally realized there are others out there who understand.

D. Barros, White Rock

• • •

I’m not sure who is responsible, but I would like to thank whomever managed to quiet the whistles of the trains that run along the foot of Panorama Ridge.

We’ve had several weeks now of peace and quiet, and when we do get the odd single bleat of a whistle it reminds us of what we have put up with over the years.

Sheila Gair, Surrey

• • •

Re: Support sought for rail study, Aug. 12.

Thank you for reporting on the topic of rail relocation. I am a resident of Crescent Beach.  Twenty BNSF trains rumble through the community every day.

Oh how wonderful it would be if the trains were relocated away from Boundary Bay.

Trish McAuliffe, Surrey

• • •

Re: Beachfront chopper tours irk residents, July 27.

The first time I head the ongoing helicopter noise, I was worried that there was a tragedy on the beach or a police incident in progress! I went online to the PAN to see if there was a news update.

I am not a waterfront condo owner. I live up the hill at Five Corners, and the ongoing noise of helicopter tours is intrusive and annoying.

If I chose to live near an airport, I would expect to have to put up with air traffic noise, just as I accept the train noise because I knew it was a fact of life when I chose to buy a White Rock condo.

But I chose to live in a small urban community with the quiet feel of a village. So much for that.

Judi Armstrong, White Rock

• • •

I note the White Rock City News advertisement in the PAN of July 29 stated that the city shares residents’ “concerns” over these helicopter rides and has been in “close contact with Transport Canada” over this matter.

They were also nice enough to provide a phone number for Transport Canada so we may voice our concerns.

The city appears to have nothing more to do with this, “as this matter falls under federal jurisdiction.”

What a way to wash one’s hands of a public issue.

Perhaps the city, if it actually shares residents’ concerns, could have contacted the Semiahmoo First Nation band over the matter. The problem lies with the band and TRK Helicopters who have entered into a business agreement knowing full well the concern of the citizens over the noise offers no consequence to either of them.

Surely the City of White Rock council could intercede on behalf of its residents with the First Nation in an endeavour to bring this noise pollution to an end.

Jim Saunders, White Rock

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Scales of Justice
Court awards woman $167K after vehicle was struck by White Rock taxi in 2016

Plaintiff’s knee injuries and resulting chronic pain disability are genuine, judge rules

An example of a Surrey Police cruiser, showcased at Mayor Doug McCallum’s State of the City Address at Civic Hotel in May of 2019. (File photo: Amy Reid)
Surrey Police Service hires first three inspectors as ‘next layer of leadership’

Three men have more than 80 years of combined experience

An officer collects forensic evidence from a police SUV following the July 18, 2015 incident that ended in the police-shooting death of Hudson Brooks in South Surrey. (File photo)
UPDATE: Verdict, recommendations in coroner’s inquest into 2015 police-shooting death in South Surrey

Review of force options among recommendations out of coroner’s inquest into death of Hudson Brooks

(Photo: Now-Leader).
Surrey Schools seeking community input for 2021-22 budget

Majority of it is pre-allocated, but room to address priorities in the community

TEASER - SAGAís Gift Shop Manager Barbie Warwick wearing The Summons while sketching in Facing Time exhibit. Photo by Pardeep Singh.jpg
‘The Summons’ face masks created as fundraiser for Surrey Art Gallery Association

Image of magnolia flower and poetry printed on specially designed mask

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry head for the B.C. legislature press theatre to give a daily update on the COVID-19 pandemic, April 6, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. nears 300,000 COVID-19 vaccinations, essential workers next

564 new cases, four deaths, no new outbreaks Thursday

Walter Gretzky father of hockey hall-of-famer Wayne Gretzky waves to fans as the Buffalo Sabres play against the Toronto Maple Leafs during third period NHL hockey action in Toronto on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky, father of the Great One, dies at 82

Walter had battled Parkinson’s disease and other health issues

Municipal Affairs Minister Josie Osborne speaks in the B.C. legislature, March 4, 2021. (Hansard TV)
B.C. Liberals, NDP sing in harmony on local election reforms

Bill regulates paid canvassers, allows people in condo buildings

(National Emergency Management Agency)
No tsunami risk to B.C. from powerful New Zealand earthquake: officials

An 8.1 magnitude earthquake shook the north of New Zealand Thursday morning

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

(AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
Pandemic stress, isolation key factors as to why Canadians turned to cannabis, alcohol

Study found that isolation played key role in Canadians’ substance use

Burnaby Mounties responded to 56 complaints and issued 10 tickets to people flouting COVID-19 restrictions in February. (Patrick Davies/100 Mile Free Press)
COVID denier fined $2,300 for hosting gathering in her home: Burnaby RCMP

The woman told Mounties she does not believe the pandemic is real

Grand Forks’ Gary Smith stands in front of his Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster float. Photo: Submitted
Grand Forks’ Flying Spaghetti Monster leader still boiling over driver’s licence photo

Gary Smith, head of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster of B.C., said he has since spoken to lawyers

Most Read