In Switzerland, dog owners can assume their pets are welcome unless otherwise notified, writes Maggie Bernet. (Contributed photo)

In Switzerland, dog owners can assume their pets are welcome unless otherwise notified, writes Maggie Bernet. (Contributed photo)

LETTERS: Switzerland gets it right when it comes to dogs

Editor:

Re: Pull plug on ‘ridiculous’ dog trial’ Oct. 11, letters

So, Alex Galo is really worried we will never get 100 per cent compliance with dog owners?

I am not sure in what kind of sheltered world you live in, but where I am sitting, dogs aren’t the problem, humans are. I am more disgusted with our government that allows drug war, gang war and poverty to flourish more every year than with our furry friends.

We live in a world where a swear word is being censored, yet we have politicians that lie through their teeth on a daily basis and get away with corrupt and criminal behavior, yet you are worried about some dog poop? I see more humans spitting on the grass and street than dogs doing their business.

I was born and raised in dog-friendly Switzerland and still today it is one of the cleanest, most organized countries in the world. Our health care system is one to brag about compared to Canada, so when you are implying dog poop is so harmful and “unhealthy,” why is Switzerland so clean?

Our dogs are allowed wherever we go. Walk the cobblestone streets and you’ll see them everywhere – snuggled up in cafés, on public transit, sleeping peacefully under chairs in fancy restaurants, poking their heads out of shoulder bags as owners shop, trotting alongside bicycles and rollerblades, greeting the bartender at their owners’ favourite pub.

In Canada, the default is “no dogs allowed.” In Switzerland, it’s the exact opposite.

You can assume your dog is welcome unless there’s a sign (or a bar employee) telling you otherwise.

I was walking down the beach last week when I started to count the dogs as I walked the entire stretch from the West Beach to the East, I stopped counting after 50, and every single dog was on a leash.

Our focus should be on how we feed, clothe and shelter our most vulnerable – the disabled the mentally ill and how we treat our vets. Dogs are not a pest they actually improve our quality of life.

Be well, Alex.

Maggie Bernet, White Rock