A French woman who bypassed U.S. border patrol by jogging south along the waterfront into Blaine spent two weeks in custody. (Braden Paul file photo)

LETTERS: Two sides to border-jogger issue

Editor: Re: Border jogger jailed, June 27.

Editor:

Re: Border jogger jailed, June 27.

I visited the Peace Arch Saturday, a mere 80 metres from the spot on the beach where Cedella Roman became a world-famous international criminal, with nothing but an unfenced railway track separating the Peace Arch Park from the beach a few metres away.

There, I joined the hordes of tourists from both sides of the border in committing the same crime as Cedella by walking under the arch straddling the border, an arch emblazoned with “May these gates never be closed.” None of us were arrested by border agents and shipped to Tacoma, despite a complete lack of signage indicating how far Canadians are allowed to meander into the U.S. or vice versa.

When I was a boy scout, our troop once drove out to the south end of Chilliwack Lake, hiked a well-maintained trail to Little Chilliwack Campground a couple of kilometres south of the U.S. border, and returned the next day. There were no markers at the border, and no ICE agents tackled us, despite the fact that we willfully broke the same law that Cedella did accidentally.

The trail is still outlined on Google Maps; somebody still maintains trails like these, despite there being no legal way to use them.

I’ve cycled along the U.S. border where nothing but a ditch separates farms on either side and seen earthen bridges wide enough for a car connecting the farms. I don’t know what farmers use these bridges for, but it’s done openly.

I’m concerned recent xenophobic fear-mongering south of the border may be eroding these types of trusts that our nations have enjoyed for centuries.

Although I understand the agents’ concern over Cedella’s lack of ID, this should have been cleared up within a few hours by her mom bringing her ID to Peace Arch, without the need for her being tossed into a cage with a hundred other people in the Tacoma Northwest Detention Center, a for-profit private immigration prison with a horrific history of violating international human-rights laws.

Hopefully, this heavy-handed insanity isn’t a permanent change in the unborderlike border that’s served us so well for so long.

Marc Ander, Surrey

• • •

Let’s give the U.S. a break on this one!

A young lady, travelling from a foreign country, decides to go for a jog along a very muddy stretch of beach here in White Rock. Are we to believe that she was not aware that we bordered the U.S.A. and, in this day and age, how security at borders have changed?

According to your article, she was picked up on Marine Drive in Blaine. I guess the beach was too muddy for her return run, and maybe if she had turned around on that beach and gone back the way she came, she would not have been stopped?

She is very lucky she was not sent back to France. She had no ID and was not a Canadian citizen.

People have to be responsible for their actions, as we all suffer the consequences. Remember the jogger who had her headphones on and ran in front of a train, and we are all still paying the price i.e. noisy train whistles and restricted access to our once-lovely beach area.

Stephen Mckeever, White Rock

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Signage outside of Mount Olive Lutheran Church in South Surrey advises of the drive-thru schedule. (Contributed photo)
Cold-weather clothing donations sought at South Surrey drive-thru effort

Weekly collection continues in Mount Olive Lutheran Church parking lot

White Rock RCMP are searching for Richard John Lewis, who is wanted on warrants for assault and uttering threats. (RCMP handout)
White Rock RCMP searching for wanted man

Richard John Lewis is wanted on warrants for assault, uttering threats

(Photo: Twitter@SurreyRCMP)
Surrey Mounties, pet owners, bracing for Halloween

Last year the Surrey RCMP received 147 fireworks complaints on Diwali and 121 on Halloween

(Delta Police Department photo)
Delta police investigating after another teen girl followed in Tsawwassen

Police say a man in a burgundy car approached teen girls on at least two, possibly three occasions

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates the COVID-19 situation, B.C. legislature, Oct. 26, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 case count jumps by 287, another senior home outbreak

Two more deaths recorded, community outbreak in Okanagan

Commissioner Austin Cullen looks at documents before opening statements at the Cullen Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in British Columbia, in Vancouver on February 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
RCMP lacked dedicated team to investigate illegal activities at casino, inquiry hears

Hearings for the inquiry are set to continue into next week and the inquiry is expected to wrap up next year

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Robert Riley Saunders. (File)
Court approves money for B.C. foster children alleging harm from Kelowna social worker

The maximum combined total award for basic payments and elevated damages for an individual is $250,000

IHIT has been called to a home on Nelson Court in Maple Ridge. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy)
Homicide team investigating at Maple Ridge home

Investigators were called to home on Nelson Court

An untitled Emily Carr painting of Finlayson Point was donated to the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria by brothers Ian and Andrew Burchett. The painting had been in their family for several decades. (Courtesy of the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria)
Never-before-seen painting by famed B.C. artist Emily Carr gifted to Victoria gallery

Painting among several donated to Art Gallery of Greater Victoria

The B.C. Centre for Disease control is telling people to keep an eye out for the poisonous death cap mushroom, which thrives in fall weather conditions. (Paul Kroeger/BCCDC)
Highly poisonous death cap mushroom discovered in Comox

This marks first discovery on Vancouver Island outside Greater Victoria area

100 Mile Conservation officer Joel Kline gingerly holds an injured but very much alive bald eagle after extracting him from a motorist’s minivan. (Photo submitted)
Rescued bald eagle that came to life in B.C. man’s car had lead poisoning

Bird is on medication and recovering in rehab centre

Most Read