LETTERS: We talked, it’s their turn

Editor:

I attended the second-edition public hearing for the proposed Oxford twin towers phased development.

Editor:

I attended the second-edition public hearing for the proposed Oxford twin towers phased development (Second hearing over Oxford highrises, Nov. 25).

I observed a stone-faced council, some busy with laptops or cellphones, sort of listening as presenters had five minutes to speak.

The passion and feeling of tower opponents continued since the 2004 phased Bosa complex, still-incomplete in Town Centre, and the December 2015 Oxford efforts.

A developer that assembled the land for the company claimed to have spent $1 million on it; he forgot to mention the prospective profit 120 units will bring. Yet the math speaks to the motivations – build tall, elite 2,500-square-foot units for off-shore buyers and other downsizing millionaires.

The process in the past decade by council for more towers has not helped to build community, nor increased local business nor helped integrate rental and social housing in our quieter low-scale city by the sea. The spin for more taxpayers and reduced taxes is a proven myth.

Send this project back to the drawing board. Untangle the water-utility sale, instant property-assessments changes, as well as sensitive environment issues we know nothing about. Simply delay any changes to land use and density until we complete the OCP, or better yet until after the next election.

Any confidence entrusted to council and the turnstile of planning staff has been destroyed; spot zoning and disrespect of taxpayers’ decades of input on towers continues.

Mayor: please give permission for each independent council member to speak and tell us why, with succinct, clear explanations by each, why you choose to vote against – or for – phased towers here on this site at the Dec. 7 council meeting.

The silence and concealment of political decisions since being elected is way too loud.

Pat Petrala, White Rock

 

 

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