Deas Island RCMP Sgt. Evan Albert – at a South Surrey impound lot – surveys luxury cars seized last week following allegations of street racing on Highway 99.

Make them really pay

Editor:

Re: Luxury-vehicle racers face $196 fines, Sept. 6.

Wow, I thought rock stars and drug dealers were the only ones able to afford these cars, but I guess this is a sign of the times.

Editor:

Re: Luxury-vehicle racers face $196 fines, Sept. 6.

Wow, I thought rock stars and drug dealers were the only ones able to afford these cars, but I guess this is a sign of the times.

There must be a lot of affluent people living in Vancouver, and it seems pointless to slap a $200 fine on the culprits. This is just pocket change to them; it certainly won’t teach them a lesson.

The police say there would have been stiffer fines for the offenders had they been caught on video. Ironically, there are hundreds of video pictures of looters and rioters from the Stanley Cup riot and only two have been officially charged thus far. In the U.K., there has been no problem charging looters and dealing with them efficiently.

If these road racers had been caught in the U.S., you bet there would be hell to pay. What’s wrong with our system? Maybe it needs to catch up to the changing times.

D. Barros, White Rock

• • •

A set fine – for example, $196 for driving without due consideration for others – hurts poor people, while it is not even noticed by the wealthy.

I think I have a more equitable formula for punishing drivers for stupid, dangerous behaviour.

Make the fine a percentage of the Black Book value of the vehicle involved in the violation.

I believe that the vast majority of vehicle owners buy a vehicle based on their income or net worth – a rich person buys an expensive vehicle, while a person of modest means buys a considerably less expensive vehicle.

If, for example, you are caught using a hand-held mobile device while driving, it would cost you, say, two per cent of the value of your vehicle, which means the driver of an old beater might end up paying $100, while someone driving a new, high-end vehicle might pay $3,000.

A drunk driver would lose 10 per cent for a first offence, doubling each time.

If you are caught running a red light, you might pay 15 per cent. Speeding could be on a sliding scale – if you are caught doing 10 to 19 kilometers per hour over the posted limit, you would pay one per cent, 20 to 29 km/h over the limit would net you a two per cent fine, and so on.

Fleeing the scene of an accident and attempting to evade police would result in a 100 per cent fine.

If your infraction is the cause of an accident, the fine could double the percentage. Injuries to other parties would triple the percentage, and deaths would quintuple it.

This would make the fines levied equally painful to all economic groups.

All of the above is just speculative, and would have to be finely tuned by a panel of police officers, lawyers, judges and legislators, with input from the public.

Jerry Steinberg, Surrey

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Surrey monitoring traffic as vehicles again clog city streets

Compared with city’s 2019 weekly average, deepest volume reduction was in late March with up to 46 per cent less vehicles

Refund emails from City of White Rock a ‘phishing’ scam

IT staff work to nullify security breach in ‘classic phishing campaign’

Art’s Scarecrow Festival returns in September

Sixth annual event will be different than previous events because of the pandemic

Surrey’s top cop is keynote speaker at Surrey Board of Trade AGM

Asssistant Commissioner Brian Edwards will be on deck at Tuesday’s ‘virtual’ meeting

B.C. records new COVID-19 death, 85 more cases; Horgan calls on celebrity help

This brings the total number of active confirmed cases to 531 across the province

Teachers to get 2 extra days to prepare for students’ return, now set for Sept. 10

Students will first start with orientation and learn rules of COVID-19 classroom policies

High-volume littering at Cape Scott draws ire from hiking groups

Popular Vancouver Island hiking spot not closing, but frustration about crowding grows

SFU to drop ‘Clan’ varsity team name

The ‘Clan’ name is shortened from ‘Clansmen,’ and was introduced roughly 55 years ago

New Tory leader must build a strong team in Commons and for the campaign: Scheer

Scheer marked his final day in the House of Commons today as leader of the Opposition

B.C. to hire 500 more COVID-19 contact tracers ahead of fall

Contract tracers add an ‘extra layer’ in the fight against the novel coronavirus

Feds commit $305M in additional funds for Indigenous communities during COVID-19

Money can be used to battle food insecurity and support children and mental health

We were a bit tone deaf: Hobo Cannabis renamed Dutch Love after backlash

Hobo Cannabis has various locations in Vancouver, Kelowna and Ottawa

Man accused of killing Red Deer doctor says he does not remember attack

Appearing before a judge, Deng Mabiour, 54, rambled about being sick and needing a doctor

Most Read