Former South Surrey resident Hannah Newman says the harder water in White Rock leaves much to be desired.

Former South Surrey resident Hannah Newman says the harder water in White Rock leaves much to be desired.

More than just a matter of taste

Editor: I went to the Epcor presentation on its Total Water Quality Management project to inform myself of what the project entails.

Editor:

I went to the Epcor presentation on its planned chlorination and Total Water Quality Management project to inform myself of what the project entails.

Will White Rock staff look beyond the physical costs of joining up with Metro Vancouver and include all the actual costs? These must include what each homeowner bears as a result of having water that is significantly harder – i.e. more minerals – than that of Metro.

I have only been a resident of White Rock for two years, previously having lived in South Surrey.

White Rock water was always touted to be far superior, however as soon as that first drop of chlorine was added to the water, I no longer see the advantage, but I do see a lot of downside. I would be willing to pay double my water bill in order to have the same beautiful water that I had in South Surrey.

Then, without all that mineral buildup, I would not have to replace so many faucets when I bought this house. I could use a lot less laundry and dishwater detergent, which is better for the environment. I could stop wiping down my stainless steel sinks after each use, etc. The less-hard water of Surrey, which I happen to think tasted pretty good, did not ruin my toilets – calcium/manganese – nor the inside of my dishwasher.

What about all of these real impacts of continuing to use water from the aquifer? How much more CLR-like products are being put down the drain because of the water’s hardness? City staff should have to consider these issues as part of its study in reflecting the ‘true’ cost of continuing to use the aquifers.

Mayor Wayne Baldwin was quoted as saying, “I think… there is no alternative unless we buy Epcor.”

The mayor and others should not confuse two separate issues: 1, who runs the water system i.e. Epcor; and 2, where does the water come from?

Epcor could still provide the same service they do now, even if we joined the Metro water supply. We’d continue to need storage towers and some sort of chlorination scheme in order to boost the chlorine in the water that is delivered to us. However, we’d no longer need a full-scale chlorination system that Epcor is currently proposing.

I hope city staff take a serious look at the possibility of joining Metro water. With the impending chlorination of all of White Rock’s water and the expense that all White Rock homeowners bear because of the water’s hardness, the status quo no longer seems reasonable.

Hannah Newman, White Rock